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Guide to Contact Lenses

  • Purchasing Contact Lenses Online?

    Purchasing contact lenses from an online supplier is tempting, but may end up costing you more in the long run. The latest trend in purchasing contact lenses involves ordering from online retail suppliers. While it may seem appealing to have your contact lenses shipped straight to your door, unfortunately, there are many disadvantages to purchasing contact lenses online...
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  • A Halloween Scare: Contact Lenses 

    Here’s one Halloween scare to avoid: Costume contact lenses.  Costume contact lenses can alter your eyes’ look without correcting your vision. These lenses can change...
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  • A Guide to Contact Lens Solutions

    Have you stood in a drug store unsure which solution is best for your contact lenses? There are multiple contact lens solutions available. These are...
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  • Why is Contact Lenses Compliance Important?

    Most people, when asked, admit that they aren’t contact lens compliant, putting their eyes at risk for complications. Contact lens materials and care techniques can...
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  • Is My Teen Ready to Wear Contacts?

    Over 8% of contact lens wearers are under 18 years old. Wearing contacts has become more of an option for teens, preteens, and even some...
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  • Teens and Contact Lenses: FAQs

    An estimated 3 million U.S. adolescents aged 12-17 years old wear contact lenses. Teenagers have their own ideas of how to dress and how they...
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  • The 3 Best Contact Lenses for Martial Arts

    Fight sports require both physical endurance and intense focus— so you need contact lenses that offer the best vision possible. Whether your fight style is...
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  • Contact Lenses: Top 10 Myths and Facts

    Over 1 in 5 adults wear contact lenses, but there are still many myths about these life-changing optical devices.  Despite the fact that contact lenses...
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  • Hydrogel vs Silicone Hydrogel Lenses

    Soft contact lenses come in hydrogel or silicone hydrogel materials – but which is best for you? The most common types of contact lenses are...
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  • Swimming in Contact Lenses

    Is it safe to wear contact lenses while swimming in a pool, lake or ocean? The simple answer is: No.  Wearing contact lenses while submerged...
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  • Reading Glasses and Contact Lenses

    Tired of wearing reading glasses? You may want to consider wearing contact lenses. As we grow older, our vision begins to change. Almost everyone develops...
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  • Why are Contact Lens Exams Important?

    Contact lenses that don’t fit properly can cause blurry vision, ocular discomfort and even eye damage. A contact lens eye exam is vital for anyone...
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  • Common Contact Lens Problems

    While wearing contact lenses is a safe alternative to eyeglasses, they can come with problems that you may not expect— especially if you are a new contact lens wearer. Here are some of the most common contact lens problems, and how to avoid them....
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  • Guide to Scleral Lenses

    Scleral lenses are a type of gas permeable (GP) lens that are specially designed for patients with corneal irregularities and other eye conditions that make contact lens wear difficult. ...
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  • Guide to Hard Contact Lenses

    While soft contact lenses have become quite popular in recent years, hard contact lenses are actually preferred by many people with specific vision conditions...
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  • Guide to Soft Contacts Lenses

    Approximately 90 percent of contact lens wearers prefer soft contact lenses. There are many different options when it comes to soft contact lenses. While your optometrist can help you to narrow down your choices— usually dependent on your prescription and personal lifestyle, it is important to be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of each type of lens...
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  • What Are Contact Lenses?

    Contact lenses are designed to cover the cornea, the clear covering of the eye. They stay in place by adhering to the tear film of the eye, and through the pressure from the eyelids.  When you blink, your eyelid glides over the contact lens, enabling a cleansing and lubricating action to keep the contact lens comfortable on the cornea....
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  • Contact Lenses for Reading

    Tired of wearing reading glasses? You may want to consider wearing contact lenses. As we grow older, our vision begins to change. Almost everyone develops...
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