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Guide to Low Vision

  • What is Low Vision?

    Do you or a loved one have low vision? Low vision is diagnosed when vision cannot be fully corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or eye surgery— allowing you to participate in every day activities. It is often accompanied by blurred vision, blind spots or tunnel vision— and may also be called legal blindness. Low vision may prevent you from driving, watching TV, reading, using a computer or participating in your favorite hobbies....
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  • Low Vision In Children 

    Many children suffer with vision loss, but there are a range of low vision aids that can give them the best chance to engage with the world around them. There are a number of conditions that can cause vision impairments in children. While some of these conditions can be treated in early childhood, many can result in low vision or even total blindness....
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  • Top Home Tips for Low Vision

    One in six adults over age of 45 and one in four adults over age 75 has low vision. Having low vision - reduced vision that can’t be improved with glasses, contact lenses, medication or surgery -  can make it difficult to perform day-to-day tasks. Fortunately, there are many things a person with low vision can do to remain independent and do the things they enjoy and love....
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  • Glaucoma, Tunnel Vision and Low Vision

    Glaucoma causes 'Tunnel Vision' and is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Glaucoma is an eye diseases that damages the optic nerve, leading to permanent vision loss. The most common type of glaucoma shows no early warning signs, and can only be detected during a comprehensive eye exam. If left untreated, glaucoma can cause peripheral vision loss and even permanent blindness....
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  • Hemianopsia and Low Vision

    A brain injury can cause the loss of over 50% of your visual field, this is known as hemianopsia. Males from the ages of 50 to 70 are most frequently affected by this condition. Over 70% hemianopsias are caused by a blockage of the blood supply in the brain, most frequently due to a tumor or stroke....
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  • Albinism and Low Vision

    Albinism affects at least 1 in 20,000 of the population. Ocular albinism affects the eyes, possibly causing dramatic loss of visual function and impact on the quality of life....
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  • Retinitis Pigmentosa and Low Vision

    An estimated 1 in 4,000 people are affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disease that causes a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina. The most common symptoms of RP include decreased peripheral vision, trouble seeing at sunset and night or colors appearing washed out. While there is no cure for most causes of RP, it can be managed effectively with the help of a low vision eye doctor...
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